3 Keys to Keeping Your Life’s Battery Charged

It’s important to keep a car battery in good condition. I know because my car wouldn’t start the other day. My Mazda Miata summer car had been patiently waiting, through the rainy winter, to take me out on a warm sunny day. And of course, with the top down! Well, that didn’t happen.  I went to Ahura (the name of the Miata), to start it up. Nada. Nothing. Zilch. Not even the headlights flickered. I didn’t understand, as I had just purchased the battery the summer before. It didn’t have a lot of time on it.

I think you are understanding the problem a lot faster than I figured it out! When I got into the car, and put the key in the ignition, I thought: “This is going to be a fun ride.” Ha! I soon learned that a car battery needs to be “exercised” at least every two weeks to stay viable. I did not know that. Now I do.

How does this relate to living a meaningful life?  You think, because you exist, that “things” will work out in your favor because you want it to.  Life has conditions and like a battery, life has best practices that need ongoing “exercise”, for best results.

When you feel run down, energy wavering, unmotivated, or floundering, it may be that your life’s battery is rundown. What can you do to recharge it?

First, you want to know what is truly important to you: not the things that are important, but rather, the values and principles that you live by and stand for. Are they responsibility, commitment, security, humor, integrity….? Take the time to know yours.

Second you want to know what your purpose (aim, intention) in life is, using your values as the principal components to define your purpose.  Along with defining your purpose, you need to determine your mission (releasing your purpose). Together, these provide the target (purpose) and the springboard (mission) for action.

From here, you determine your goals and objectives, add your timelines to them and set times to review, edit, and tweak.

Just like keeping your car battery in good order, you can keep your life in good order.  It is merely a matter of knowing how and following through on the best practice actions. 

You may not even know there’s a problem until there is a problem with your car or life battery. Now you have tools to help you recharge your battery.

If this sparked a thought or inspiration for you, write a comment. Let me know what you think on recharging your life’s battery. I would love to hear from you.

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Wisdom from the Ages Can Be Accessed from this One Tip

I recently read a recommended book. The author, Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) wrote an autobiography, which was published posthumously in 1868. I would like to share a point that resonates with me and is as relevant today as it was for him, two hundred plus years ago.

To give you a little background, Franklin believed strongly in the attributes virtues had He went so far as to define the thirteen core virtues which were cornerstones to his life.  He defined what each meant to him, and this is insightful,  because he understood that each person defined virtues, individually. His definition was not necessarily theirs and vice versa.

Rather than focus on all thirteen virtues, he isolated one at a time. He started with temperance which he described as: “eat not to dullness, drink not to elevation” and focused on it for a week. He then moved on to the next, which for him, was silence, defined for him as: “speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation”, the next week he focused on order “let all things have their places; resolution “resolve to perform what you ought, perform without fail what you resolve” and so on.

As he focused on only one virtue per week, he could gain greater understanding of it for himself and its valuable application in his life. As the years went by he became dedicated and pronounced with his virtues, refining them in his daily life.   This contributed to the respect he garnished. He took the time to live from his “virtues”, intimately.

Each day he would begin by asking himself: “What good shall I do this day.” In the evening, he would reflect on his morning question by asking: “What good have I done to-day?” using one of the thirteen virtues he was focusing on.

Now, that is Wisdom from the ages.

Listen for It, Listen to It, It’s There to Help

Have you ever found yourself in a situation where you have witnessed your own behaviors in action?

Here is an example: You are in your car, driving down the highway, it’s twilight, with the sun just about out of sight. But it’s not quite night. Others in their cars, like you, are heading home, perhaps distracted, already thinking about dinner, to dos, tv shows, and home conversations.

You turn your signal in to indicate your intention to move from the left the middle lane. You look to see if anyone from the far-right lane is indicating they are going to turn to the middle lane. All clear.

Then that voice, one you have heard inside your head before, reaches out and tells you not to go into the middle lane, that far-right lane car is going to move into the middle lane.  You stay where you are and sure enough, THAT car moves into the middle lane about which you had signaled your intention. And they moved over without any signal, nothing. But you knew. Good thing you listened to THAT voice. It may have saved you a trip to the hospital.

How do you recognize THAT voice? It’s a protective, sagacious, and valuable voice. Researchers at the University of Toronto, Scarborough, conducted a study where participants repeated a word over and over as they performed a test: push the button when a certain symbol flashes on the screen. As this symbol flashed on the screen frequently, it could set off and did set off impulsive responses. The researchers found that when participants could not listen to their own inner “talk”, they were more likely to act more impulsively.  The researchers said this about the study: “Without being able to verbalize messages to themselves, they were not able to exercise the same amount of self-control as when they could themselves through the process.”

Listen for it, listen to it…your inner voice. It’s there to help.

I Made a Startling Observation about Leadership

I recently noted something I want to talk about. A little while ago I attended a “town hall” meeting of a group to which I have been a member and one-time leader for well over a decade. At this meeting of about 200 people, I experienced a phenomenon that may have always been there. Let me explain.

There are members who feel comfortable in criticizing the leadership, the direction and other parts of the organization. They are vocal in their criticism, sometimes sparking controversy and sometimes adding fuel to fires already lit. But, often, something changes within them, that they do not see, when they become titled leaders of the overarching organization of the group.

Suddenly, as if a switch has been activated within them, their criticism transforms into a call for peace and understanding, for tolerance and respect. Those who criticized now call for an end to “negativity”, the negativity they had sparked or fueled, themselves, at one time.

Until recently I had not noticed anything askew about this change. But, for some reason, I now focused my attention on a question. I asked myself: “Why, as leaders, do we shut down criticism, when as followers we initiate or support criticism?” As leaders we tend to seek harmony and while as followers we tend to seek a voice. But so often, neither listens to the other. Each merely wants to shut the other down.

I find it interesting that we cannot look at both criticism and the role of “leadership” as being two sides of the same coin. Neither are inherently “better.” Neither are inherently “right.” I believe voices want to convey something even if their expression, or the words themselves, seem divisive. Leaders are not necessarily parents or moral authorities but can think they are, because they have been given implicit responsibilities or titles.

How do you view criticism? Do you try to shut it down? Do you tolerate it? Do you know how to speak to it, so it feels heard, while still maintaining your center? How do you view leadership? Does it have an implicit authority that overrules a “voice?” How do you build a bridge to listening and collaboration when criticism and harmony live together?

 

Trust is like a Spider Web

In a book I recently read, trust was defined in one word: predictability. That was powerful. And I began to inquire: “Is that all? Maybe that’s what trust comes down to.”

So, I started looking at trust more carefully, or more specifically, my use of trust, I understood it to be more than predictability. But what more was it? I looked at trust for me and saw that what was missing in this one-word definition were the additional components that give trust its almost mercurial characteristic. I would like to mention them here.

I have found that trust includes a sense of reliance in someone’s character. Where predictability infers expectation, reliability infers consistency. Whether it is a sense of reliance in their sincerity, their competency, or the way they show up, reliance in someone is a major ingredient to trust.

Another component to trust rests in understanding one’s motivations. Motivations reveal intentions, priorities, goals and needs. When I understand someone’s motivation, I can bestow trust.

Yet another component to trust is the feeling of true authority born by experience and not merely by knowledge. When I sense that someone is a student of what they are talking about, rather than a transmitter or information, I can grant trust.

What I find interesting about trust is that we can provide trust quickly, slowly, or not at all. There seems to be a continuum for the application of trust. I have found that this continuum revolves around feelings of safety, feelings of reciprocity, and feelings of being understood. Trust is a mighty bridge to building and sustaining connection. And like a spider web-strand which is ten times stronger than steel at its same weight, trust is a strong bond between people. And again, like the spider strand which can be easily broken and change the nature of the web, trust can be broken or withdrawn suddenly, and like the spider web, changes the nature of the relationship to which it was bound.

Let me know your thoughts on trust. How do you experience trust? How do you dole out trust? What causes you to withdraw trust?

Starbucks Offers More than Coffee and Tea

In his book, Onward, Schultz wrote: “Stick to your values, they are your foundation.” He said these were key to rebuilding Starbucks.

Schultz demonstrated the fundamental benefit to a company having values, and using them to build their presence. “It is our mission to make sure the world sees us through those lenses.” He wrote.

Starbuck’s values are: Community, Connection, Respect, Dignity, Humor, Humanity, and Accountability. “They are visibly evident and often referred to in meetings and prior to key actions.

Values not only impact a company; they also impact our individual lives. What are your values? What role do they have in your life-are they directors in your life, or merely white noise around your life?

In a fast-paced world of deadlines and expectations, where impatience can override wisdom and expediency overrides understanding, values can get swept aside for “later.” This can have disastrous consequences in communication, in decisions and in the choices one makes.

Values are part of an intentional life. They form the foundation of success. Howard Schultz recognized the essential nature of this. Like Starbucks, how do you make your values the cornerstones to your life?

Partner with your Strengths. They Are Ready to Serve You

Without our strengths, we would not be able to dispel threats, dangers and alarms. We would not be able to demonstrate skill, or show off, or be able to intercede when necessary.  Strengths are like breathing. We need to use them and often do, without thinking. The problem is like breathing, if we don’t know how to use them in various conditions, they may not be able to serve us when we need them most.

If you were in a smoke-filled house, wouldn’t it be important to know how to hold your breath as you got past the smoke; the smoke that kills more people than fire?  Your strengths are also how you show yourself to the world around you. When you want to impress, when you want to show off, when you want to make a statement or add value to a situation, you call on your strengths to “introduce” you. Your strengths are how people see you. They are a tangible representation of who you are.  We use them to perform and most people judge us by our performances.

Researchers in positive psychology have discovered that when we identify and regularly use our signature character strengths, life becomes more satisfying and meaningful.

Strengths are what I call your “Outer Cloak.” They are what you “wear” when you are out in the world expressing yourself, when you want to make an impression, when you need to accomplish a task or serious endeavor. You use your strengths. For example, you might express your strength in generosity when you are out with friends, your ability to organize in accomplishing a task, or your ability to persevere when undertaking serious endeavor.

Most of the time, however, you are unaware of the strengths you are applying. Most of the time you are unaware of how others see these strengths in you.

How do your top three strengths add meaning to your life? Let me know as I would like to hear what you say.

The Importance of Living a Meaningful Life Through Your Values

Values provide us a compass by which we live our lives. Although values are always present, we rarely give them much thought. Much like a compass we use on an unfamiliar hike, values provide us the platform from which we direct our lives. We judge based on the consistency of values utilized by someone.

 

The Barrett Values Center, in 2010, found, in researching more than two thousand private and public institutions in more than sixty countries, that: “Values-driven organizations are the most successful organizations on the planet. They found that values drive the culture as well as contribute to the employees’ fulfillment. In the book Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies by Jim Collins and Jerry Porras, the noted the same outcome in companies they observed over several decades.

 

Martin Seligman, a leader in the positive psychology movement, found, through his questionnaire, that signature strengths and values fundamentally contribute to a meaningful life.

 

I remember, many years ago, thinking that emotions were fleeting and mercurial. They seemed to be missing a key ingredient to living fully.  When I was first introduced to the concept of values I thought they were a wonderful state to aspire to.  Years later, when I identified my core values, I felt a strong resonance and connection to my life. I realized that I could live from my values and when I did, life was clearer and more satisfying, with richer meaning and depth. I realized that they were my compass, the one I had been missing and to which my emotions could not relate.

 

What are your values? How cognizant are you of them on a daily basis?

It’s Time to Alter the Traditional Financial Security Model

People are living longer lives. More years are being spent post work. And the current model of financial security funded by 401ks and social security is cracking.  Three out of five boomers, according to a recent report from Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, are forced to retire due to “layoffs, organizational changes, health concerns and family responsibilities.” Only one in six can retire early, with a secure financial net to carry them through their golden years.  The 2008 “Great Recession” hit the boomers hard as many found their retirement savings severely reduced, were laid off, or could not find increasing salaries above inflation adjustments to fund their lifestyles.

 

Boomers are not alone.  The Generation Xers, born between the mid-1960s and the early 1980s, are concerned about their financial security. According to the Transamerica 17th annual Retirement Survey, only 12% of Xers are confident they will be able to retire comfortably, 30% have taken a loan or an early withdrawal from their retirement accounts an 86% are concerned that social security will not be there for them when they retire. Their median retirement savings is: $69,000.

 

It is time for a change to the financial model we have in place.

 

I think it is odd that people can work and then find themselves without enough money in their sunset years, after they provided great benefit to companies they worked for. I find it egregious that companies skating on the thin line of ethical standards, can jeopardize the financial security of their employees, while the founders or CEOs raid the company to line their own pockets. I think it is not right that so many retirees do not have a secure financial base at a time of life when they are more prone to disease, increasing costs, and shrinking opportunities. Dementia and Cancer are potentially major financial requirements that can reduce a couple’s assets to almost nothing. I think it is terrible that very capable workers are unable to find jobs due to efficiencies of businesses and now find themselves falling further and further behind financially. These stresses do not help people live productive lives.  

 

It is time for a change.

 

Some countries are looking at alternatives. Canada and Finland and Switzerland, for instance, are looking at a base universal income. Switzerland is talking about a guaranteed income of 30,000 Swiss francs for its citizens. Here in the U.S., Alaska has been paying its residents a dividend since the 1980s. This dividend is based on the oil revenue it produces.

 

What are you experiencing in your community as it examines its own economic security? Let me know. I would love to hear what you experience.

We Are Not the Only Ones Who Feel Injustice

The Capuchin Monkey, a small and baby faced primate has some curious behaviors and habits. No, Michael Jackson’s Bubbles was not a Capuchin Monkey, but Justin Bieber’s Mally is.

It is very intelligent with skills ranging from hustling as a street performer to providing assistance to quadriplegics. It is trained to serve much like an assistance dog is trained to do. It can perform everyday tasks like opening bottles and microwaving food. But that is not why I wanted to introduce you to the Capuchin Monkey. REALLY!!!

This monkey, which likes to live in big colonies and wander wide areas, was chosen for a study: Determine how it responded to rewards. This particular study was conducted about ten years ago, at Emory University, by renown primatologist and professor Frans de Waal. He called this research, which involved studying the behaviors of two Capuchin Monkeys under a specific setting, The “Fairness Study.”  

He assigned the same tasks to these two monkeys. Whoever was finished first was awarded a cucumber. The winning monkey took its prize willingly but not with any extra glee. And that made sense because the Capuchin Monkey considers the cucumber to be an acceptable reward but not as rewarding as receiving a grape.  

The dynamics between the two monkeys was copacetic as long as the winning monkey received the cucumber and the other monkey received nothing. But the dynamics between the two monkeys changed when Dr. de Waal gave grapes to the monkey who came in second at the same task. When the” winning monkey” saw the other one receiving grapes for doing the EXACT same task but slower, the “winner“ had a fit. It rattled its cage, it pounded the table in protest, it was not going to let such an “unfairness” go unnoticed.

The monkeys clearly understood the distinction between the two prizes, and the “winning monkey” thought it had been given a lesser reward for finishing its tasks first.

How do you deal when you are provoked by injustice? Do you rant and rattle like the “winner monkey?”  Do you confront the provider of the reward for their “inequity?” Do you not care as all rewards are good rewards? Do you ask to see the “rules” before you play “the game?” Injustice is ever present. Do you deal with it on an emotional level or on a principled level?

And we thought we were the only ones who felt injustice. I thought you would want to know what I found.